Acer And Lenovo Price Their Windows Tablets: Not A Bad Start, But It Looks Expensive For Consumers

In what is likely to become a trend in the next month, two OEMs announce their Windows tablet pricing pretty much at the same time. Acer has bagged the “first!” title for announcing and getting journalist/blogger hands on its Windows 8 tablets; (I’m assuming, of course, that those leaked ASUS prices were simply a joke/placeholder). Shortly after, Lenovo unveiled the pricing for its raft of tablets. My initial impressions: not bad, some interesting innovation, still a bit pricey for consumers (particularly for an Acer), and it throws Microsoft Surface pricing into even more doubt.

Acer

As of November 9, you will be able to buy a Windows 8 tablet for less than $500. That price will get you the 10.1-inch, 32 Gb Acer Iconia W510, fully $100 cheaper than the equivalent iPad (although the screen resolution is much lower). But, disappointingly, to get a keyboard dock included, you need to get the more expensive 64 Gb version with a $750 sticker price; as yet, there’s no price for buying the keyboard dock separately.

Interestingly, Acer also plans to sell the Iconia W700 for $799 to $999. Wait, what? An 11.6-inch tablet using a “proper” Intel CPU, with a better resolution screen, twice the storage, a dock, and a Bluetooth keyboard will be within $50 of the keyboard version of the W510?

Lenovo

Lenovo seems keen to cover every conceivable base with its Windows tablet offerings:

  1. The ThinkPad Tablet 2 is broadly similar to the Acer Iconia W510 and starts at $649 ($799 with a keyboard dock). The ThinkPad name clearly indicates that this is a business-focused device.
  2. The ThinkPad Twist is another business-focused machine and is really a convertible laptop rather than a true tablet. It starts at $849 — a fairly aggressive price for a true laptop replacement.
  3. Similarly, the IdeaPad Yoga 13 is a convertible 13-inch that starts at $1,099 (yikes!). There is also an 11-inch IdeaPad Yoga 11 that — most interestingly — is a Tegra-based Windows RT device starting at $799.
  4. Finally, the IdeaTab Lynx is the consumer tablet (and a close relative to the Acer Iconia W700). It has an 11.6-inch display with a Clover Trail processor and starts at $599 (plus $150 for the keyboard dock).

What this means:

  • We’re unlikely to see x86-based OEM Windows 8 tablets for less than $500 — or $750 for keyboard versions. While it is trying its utmost to shed its cheap-and-cheerful image, Acer still tends to come in at the low end of the OEM pricing spectrum. Similarly, Lenovo’s consumer PCs tend to emphasize value, while the ThinkPad business range focuses on solid reliability. Here, we can see the two OEMs with probably the lowest prices. Sony, HP, Samsung, and ASUS will almost certainly charge more for their equivalent tablets, and even Dell is likely to be on par at best.
  • The low-end Windows tablets aren’t a great replacement for laptops. We must also remember that the Clover Trail-based tablets are basically rocking an optimized netbook processor. While this should guarantee good battery life and a cooler running temperature, we’ve yet to see how well this tablet configuration performs in real-world, multitasking use; it’s likely to be as good as other tablets, but it certainly isn’t a replacement for a decent laptop. True PC replacements will probably need: 1) Intel Core i3/i5/i7-based CPUs, which will likely be markedly more expensive (I did mention what a bargain the Surface Pro is looking to be!), and 2) systems based on the newly announced AMD Z-60, which will carve out a middle ground between the two Intel platforms.
  • Is the Windows Surface Pro really “only” $800? This pricing also makes Ballmer’s $300 to $800 price range for Microsoft Surface devices look shaky. The x86-based Surface Pro will be at the top of that super-wide range — but has a high-resolution display, 64 Gb or 128 Gb of storage, keyboard / cover and a Core i5 processor instead of the weedy Clover Trail Atom processor that’s in both the Iconia W510 and IdeaTab Lynx (warning: don’t use it on your lap!). That starts to look like a comparative bargain if it really is only $800. With an extended warranty, the Acer Iconia W700 already runs up to $1,049.
  • The $199 Windows Surface RT really was just wishful thinking. ARM-based Windows 8 tablets should be cheaper than x86 tablets, but how much cheaper? $299 to $399 or $399 to $499 seem to be the current bets (without keyboards), but we haven’t seen any offerings as cheap as this yet. Lenovo is obviously hoping that the innovative design of the IdeaPad Yoga 11 will command a massive premium! Let’s face it, a $499 Windows RT tablet isn’t going to fly with consumers, particularly when an x86 is the same price (for a lower spec potentially) — thats even assuming consumers can be dragged away from the Apple aisle. Even $350 to $399 is beyond the “impulse buy” price range that might help them fly off of the shelf. I’m not sure Microsoft will need those midnight openings to satisfy pent-up demand.
  • Obviously BOM (Bill of materials) is restricting how low prices can go. There is already some excellent analysis putting the cost of building a Microsoft Surface RT tablet at $300+, an x86 version would be slightly more. As Android tablet makers discovered, the display & touchscreen elements don’t come cheap – and that was when they didn’t have to pay for an OS! For a new product category without volume supply / manufacturing economies (like Apple has) there is precious little margin to be had if the retail price is to be attractive to consumers.

To be fair, it’s still early days. The Surface Pro isn’t scheduled to be released until early 2013, and Acer or Lenovo could adjust prices down as other OEMs lift the veil on their hardware. The most promising devices so far (that we know the price of) are those PC-replacement convertibles; they match the price of Ultrabooks and offer the best of both worlds, albeit in a more bulky package.

My guess is that by the end of the year, Clover Trail Windows 8 tablets (without keyboard) will be available from $399; “PC-replacement” tablets will be around the $799 mark; and Microsoft will still choose to price the Surface Pro at more than $800 ($899 or $999 seem most likely) to appease its OEM partners.

The Synology And Symform Partnership: The Future Of Consumer And SMB Storage

Last week, Synology announced a partnership with innovative cloud storage firm Symform. Finally, someone is combining the peace of mind and worry-free connectivity speed of the network-attached storage (NAS) drive with the convenience of cloud storage. Arguably, this is targeted more at small and medium-size businesses (SMBs) — those big enough to have a security and backup policy but too small (or too cheap) to build an enterprise relationship with a commercial cloud provider like Amazon. However, even with my consumer-focused hat on, I see a lot to like:

  • It allows a trickle update of cloud files. As anyone who has wondered what the hell Microsoft’s SkyDrive desktop app is doing as it whirs away for a couple of hours will know that syncing to the cloud is still pretty tedious — especially if your connectivity speed isn’t up to scratch. By adding a central repository of your data on the always-on NAS drive, you bypass this issue while still ensuring your files are available in the cloud.
  • It pairs two technologies that lack sufficient mainstream appeal, creating a compelling hybrid. As I’ve said before, NAS technology hasn’t hit the levels of popularity that I expected it to 5-8 years ago; it will ultimately be replaced by cloud storage — but not for many years yet. I’ve also said that in the long term, cloud storage isn’t really an “application” or a ”service”; it’s a facet or feature of other applications or services. Pairing lots of local networked storage with cloud back-up (or even just key directory duplication) means that you are getting the best of both worlds now rather than waiting for all-encompassing, super-reliable online services of the future.
  • Symform’s business model doesn’t limit the amount you store in the cloud (unlike its competitors). Effectively, Symform works as a coordinator of available peer-to-peer (P2P) storage: Agree to let Symform use some of your space hard disk space (either on a PC, a NAS drive, or a server), and it will give you half of that amount as cloud storage for free (on top of the initial 10 Gb allowance). Symform promises secure, regulatory-compliant, globally distributed cloud storage for little more than the price of adding a new hard disk to your rack/NAS /PC – and that’s if your storage is nearly full. Of course, you can pay as well . . . but that makes the offering significantly less attractive.

But, there are some bridges yet to cross:

  • It still means shelling out at least $500 for the local storage. Cost remains the biggest issue for consumers or small businesses looking at network storage. Why would you pay at least $400 for the most basic 2 Tb Synology NAS set-up (for example, the DS212j plus two Western Digital 2 Tb drives) when you can buy a 3 Tb Seagate external USB3 drive for $135?* Well, there are lots of reasons that a seasoned IT professional would recognise: availability, redundancy, multidevice access, file syncing, and management tools to name a few . . . but none of these resonate with mainstream consumers (oe even the small end of the business world). Let’s not forget that consumers are still failing to manage and back up the gigabytes of unique and irreplaceable content generated by their digital cameras.
  • Symform’s business model is both a blessing and a curse. While I commend Symform for coming up with something different from the largely interchangeable offerings of Box, Microsoft, Google, Amazon, and Dropbox, there are still some thorny questions that need answering:
  1. Can Symform make money if only a small fraction of users pay for storage? Of course, you could argue that the same can be said of Dropbox or Box; at least Symform doesn’t have to invest in building massive storage capacity to support its service.
  2. Can a P2P solution rival a big honking data center in Texas for reliability and speed? Again, there is a persuasive argument that P2P is more robust and efficient than traditional “client-server” models — just look at BitTorrent technology. As with BitTorrent, redundancy will be the key; its imperative that a user’s files aren’t corrupted if another customer’s storage node drops out of the pool.
  3. Is it legal? This is an argument that could run and run (and I’m not a lawyer…don’t even play one on TV). Government agencies already frown upon cloud solutions which store files/data outside their home geography. Does distributing tiny fragments of files globally make this better or worse? Similarly, can the US government ask for access to customers’ files as they can from other US cloud providers? Incidentally, it’s a myth that the 2001 Patriot Act makes the US the only country able to do this.
  4. Given the above, is Symform a long-term bet? Back-up is, by definition, all about peace of mind. You want your data to be secure both now and for the foreseeable future. This makes Symform a risky bet for businesses — although at least switching to a different service is easier these days than replacing actual physical back-up devices.
  • The security and confidentiality of cloud storage will continue to be an issue, especially given Symform’s business model. When it comes to cloud storage, IT pros rightly point out that file security and confidentiality can be a real issue; you are effectively transmitting your files (usually unencrypted) to a remote data centre protected by a single password. And you could argue that this issue is compounded by Symform then farming out the virtual data center to other individuals’ NAS drives.

Overall, I hope that Symform succeeds — they are trying something different and in theory offering a valuable free-ish service with little downside. The Synology partnership certainly strengthens its hand, while also making its NAS drives more appealing. There is bound to be a shake-up in the cloud storage market in the next 12 to 18 months; too many firms are offering free or low-cost storage with little differentiation. Symform at least has the advantage of a different infrastructure and business model.

* Of course, we’re not strictly comparing like with like here; the 2 Tb Synology set-up is offering RAID redundancy, and it could be configured as a 4 Tb storage option

Wii U: Can Nintendo Win Through With Its (Probably) Final Home Console?

At various points during the past 24 hours, Nintendo has revealed the release dates and prices of the Wii U console in different geographic markets. Two versions will ship: a basic/White Wii U (Japan: ¥26,250; US: $299; UK/EU: around £200 or €250) and a Premium Black Wii U (Japan: ¥31,500; US: $349; UK/ EU: around £250 or €310). For the extra $50, aside from a more traditional console colour, you get four times more Flash memory (32 GB), charging stands for the tablet controller and console, a bundled NintendoLand mini-game collection, and a three-month pass for the “Nintendo Network Premium” online service. Initially, the games won’t support a second tablet controller (which, when purchased separately, will cost a whooping ¥13,440 in Japan — the only market where they are available separately at launch), but this will come over time. The good news is that almost all the Wii controllers, balance boards, and other random bits of plastic you’ve invested in should work with the new console.

Some initial thoughts:

  • Is the pricing right? Putting aside regional variations — Japan has always paid more for its consoles, and Europe has variable value-added tax — the price of the new console isn’t too bad. Sure, it’s higher than traditional Nintendo launch prices, but this was partly forced on the company by the competition. It’s certainly cheaper than the last-generation launch prices from Microsoft and Sony. A more interesting question is whether consumers are still prepared to pony up $350 for a new console when they have other compelling options like tablets, smartphones, and social gaming in which to invest. Incidentally, Gamesutra has a very nice comparison of historic console launch prices, even adjusting for inflation, here.
  • The tablet controller offers some interesting “second screen” game-play opportunities. Many game publishers already complement console/PC releases with companion iPad games or apps (e.g., Mass Effect 3 Infiltrator and Datapad Apps). Nintendo and Sony have also offered console connectivity for their portable consoles in the past. But this is the first time that the second display can be taken as a given for the entire console-owning base. Naturally, the first opportunity is to use the controller screen in a similar fashion to the lower touchscreen on a Nintendo DS. Over and above that, though, developers are pushing the boundaries with asymmetric multiplayer gaming as a real differentiator — i.e., up to 4 ”players” use traditional controllers to interact with the game on the TV, while another player assumes a “God” (or spectator) role with the tablet controller, looking on and driving the overall experience. This effectively takes role-playing gaming right the way back to the original Gary Gygax Dungeons and Dragons tabletop game. Penny Arcade sees some cynical, but probably true downsides to this!
  • This brings second screen TV entertainment to the rest of us. The Wii U TVii functions look nice, allowing social discussion, deeper program engagement (maybe with advertising?), and a more intuitive program guide integrated with multiple providers . . . all for free out of the box in North America. Not that you couldn’t already do this with an iPad (costing from $399) or with an Xbox 360 and “Project Glass” (provided you have Xbox Live Gold for $60 a year and a compatible tablet costing . . . well who knows!) if you were a geek with money to burn. So it’s a much cheaper solution for what looks like a nice experience. All the major US/Canadian networks are on board, along with Netflix, Amazon, Hulu, etc. It’s not yet clear how much extra effort these content and distribution firms will invest in generating the required metadata, but at least many of the sports stats, trivia and social connections are pretty much already there to be tapped into.
  • Why is this likely to be Nintendo’s last home console? Even though we’ve watched OnLive crash and burn and Gaikai be absorbed by Sony, this doesn’t mean game streaming is dead — the days of dedicated game consoles are still drawing to an inevitable close. Why? For the same reason that dedicated cable boxes or video-streaming boxes like Boxee will disappear. The technology will be incorporated into other devices; it could be the TV, a wirelessly connected tablet, or eventually a proper functional cloud streaming service. Incidently, Microsoft and Sony also have just one more console in them; by the end of that generation (in five years’ time, perhaps), I’d expect expensive, dedicated console hardware to have run its course.
  • It has the field to itself for a year. Speaking of the competition, it’s clear that we won’t see new consoles from Sony and Microsoft for at least a year, maybe longer. Nintendo will have the ”next generation” to itself — although Sony and Microsoft will argue, with some validity, that the Wii U is only really comparable with their current generation. Another factor that may help Nintendo in the closing months of 2012 is the delay of several key titles (such as Bioshock Infinite, Tomb Raider, Alien: Colonial Marines, DmC, etc.) to early 2013, leaving core gamers with extra money to spend; some of that may well head Nintendo’s way.

So, can the Wii U succeed? It’s by no means a slam-dunk for Nintendo. Many dedicated gamers — Nintendo’s old core audience — felt let down by the “casual” games that proliferated on the Wii (ironically, the same games that made the console a mainstream success), along with too many Mario ports (no sign of that changing) and mainstream consumers have long since boxed up their Wiis. Add in the rise of social gaming on PCs and tablets, and the appeal of a dedicated console that doesn’t even play DVDs, let alone Blu-ray discs and with just one (albeit innovative) controller seems tough. But Nintendo needs this to work. Unlike Sony and Microsoft, it doesn’t have a fall-back business model or ”multidevice living-room strategy” from which to recoup its investment. And the additional pressures in the portable gaming space from smartphones and tablets mean that Nintendo really has a battle for survival on its hands.

My take: At this stage, I’m prepared to give Nintendo the benefit of the doubt. The hardware looks good; it has strong support from publishers and TV content/distribution owners in North America; and backward compatibility with Wii titles means that there is an extensive collection of games out there in addition to the launch window titles. By the end of Q1 2013, we’ll have a better idea of whether Nintendo will survive as a home console platform owner or follow Atari and Sega down the software-only route.

 

Amazon’s Kindle Fire Raises The Table Stakes For Tablets

As expected, Jeff Bezos announced new Kindle products yesterday in Santa Monica — and what an interesting range of products these turned out to be! While the updated Kindle eReaders offer better performance and a lower price point for those dedicated eBook lovers, it’s the Fire range that really impressed.

In place of the low-powered, fairly low-spec, North America-only original device, there are now three to four devices — running the gamut from version 2 of the original all the way up to the 4G-enabled 8.9-inch Kindle HD with its own data plan. The pricing of the devices is even more intriguing — at $159 for the lower-end 7-inch tablet, $199 for the 7-inch HD tablet, and $299 for the 8.9-inch HD tablet (Wi-Fi only), these represent a new challenge to other manufacturers’ Android devices and Microsoft’s upcoming Windows 8 tablets. Additionally, European markets (the UK, Germany France, Spain, Italy) will get to see the 7-inch Fire devices (both version 2 of the original and the HD device) at more or less the same time as the US – no sign of the larger device, but that’s probably reserved for the US market while supply ramps up.

What does this mean?

  • Android tablets (aside from the Nexus) are dead in the water. With Google and Amazon both squeezing the price of Android tablets, its difficult to see how Samsung, HTC, etc. can compete in this space, especially given that they don’t have Amazon’s and Google’s alternate revenue streams to supplement loss-leader hardware. The Verge published a very good article on this prior to Amazon’s announcement.
  • Microsoft finds itself at a crossroads. Microsoft now has two options for the Windows 8 RT tablets:
  1. Stick to its “The Kindle Fire and the iPad are just for content consumption; Windows RT tablets will be for so much more” message that has been its mantra for several years and try to price high — a strategy that’s almost certainly doomed to failure if it relies on retail and mainstream consumers to understand the difference.
  2. Price the Microsoft Surface (RT version) competitively to hit Google and Amazon head on and undercut Apple. The downside here is that it means alienating those already-alienated Android OEMs as well (on the ARM platform at least). Also, Microsoft has very little content or advertising revenue to make its money back on hardware subsidies. So as previously mentioned, the $199 Microsoft Surface RT seems unlikely.
  • Apple needs to adjust its medium-term strategy. The iPad, iPhone 5, and (probable) iPad Mini will naturally continue Apple’s policy of premium pricing: Why would it slash margins when the competition hasn’t really made an impact? But it’s more important for Apple now to look at what price its tablets will be in 12 to 18 months’ time — a time frame that allows for Amazon Fire, Google Nexus, and even Microsoft tablets to establish a decent market share and application ecosystem. In a market of similarly designed — lawsuits allowing! — well-built devices with active developer support, Apple will need to adjust its pricing accordingly; consumer ties to the iTunes ecosystem can only be stretched so far.
  • For consumers, it’s win/win (after six months of pain). The upshot of all of this for consumers is that there will be much more choice in the tablet space, more competitive pricing, and a wide variety of capabilities and ecosystems to choose from. This won’t happen overnight, though. To get to this tablet heaven, we’ll need to go through a glut of dismal Android tablets dumped on the market by those OEMs boxed in by Google/Amazon; Windows RT tablets arriving with their confusing “It’s a proper PC, but not really a proper PC” messaging; and endless discussions about poor battery life, built-in obsolescence, and app stores.

What’s next? Apple’s iPad Mini announcement will mix things up again in the next month, and we’re still waiting on pricing details for Windows tablets.

Windows 8 Devices Dominate IFA 2012: They Look Great; Take My Money! (But How Much Are They?)

For once, IFA in Germany was quite interesting, with many OEMs taking the opportunity to unveil their next generation of tablets and smartphones – the majority of which ran versions of Windows 8.

Both Sony and Toshiba offered sliding-keyboard Windows tablets, with Sony also showing a 20-inch tablet. Dell had a good-looking update of its “flip-screen” Dell Duo device — the Dell XPS Duo 12 — along with a 10-inch Windows RT device. .

Samsung labelled its family of Windows 8 devices “ATIV” — announcing both ARM and Intel tablets as well as a smartphone.

Several OEMs also showed touchscreen ultrabooks — HP, Samsung, and Acer among them. Asus revealed a hybrid laptop (the Taichi)  with two screens, effectively putting the tablet screen on the outer lid of the laptop. Samsung has a similar prototype. A bunch of all-in-ones also sported a Windows 8 update, which should be a shoe-in for one of the few PC categories that’s still shown growth over the past couple of years (admittedly from a tiny base).

Of course, while this is interesting to analysts and the kind of obsessive tech fans who read Engadget and Gizmodo, none of this will feel real to consumers until they see devices on sale in Best Buy or Carphone Warehouse.

Naturally, pricing details are still fairly thin on the ground. This is not too much of an issue normally; you can usually guess a price point based on existing products. But the spectrum of potential prices is particularly wide here, especially for the Windows RT tablets; we still don’t know if the Microsoft Surface RT tablet will really be priced at $199, and so the price of the rival RT tablets could be all over the place. Google’s Nexus 7 and Amazon’s Kindle Fire come in at $199 (should you manage to find stock of the latter), but these are just mid-level 7-inch devices. Will a 10-inch Windows RT tablet command a premium? Probably, but only $100 to $150 at most. Hopefully, manufacturers won’t make the “same price as an iPad” mistake again! It’s clearer where pricing will go for Intel-based tablets, both the low-power units and the true PC tablets; they are going to come in at around $600 to $800 for entry-level devices and will head up from there as they become hybrid ultrabooks.

Another reason that OEMs (and Microsoft) may be keeping their powder dry on pricing is the impending announcements from the rival camps. Amazon is expected to announce new Fire devices on September 6 — including a rumoured ad-supported tablet — and potentially a wider geographic reach than just the US. And, of course, Apple is on the verge (maybe) of announcing the ”iPad mini.” Nokia may even get in on the Windows tablet action when it announces new smartphones on September 5; after all, it did release a lovely looking premium netbook  (albeit with sales as near to zero as worth measuring).

With the likes of Sony, Samsung, and Lenovo also showing new Android tablets and smartphones at IFA, the tablet war is finally kicking off!

Hypothetically, What Would A $199 Windows RT Surface Tablet Say About Microsoft’s Strategy?

The inter-web is awash with rumours that the Microsoft Surface tablet (ARM version) will launch in October at a price point of $199. This is less than half the price many people were expecting on the assumption that Microsoft was following the more usual “price it the same as an iPad and see if it sells” strategy (it won’t).

Is it plausible that this is the target price? If so, and I have no deeper insight into the validity of the rumour than anyone else, what does it tell us about Microsoft’s state of mind?

  • Suddenly, it’s a two-platform strategy: Windows RT is for media consumption. One of the main concerns around both ARM and x86 tablets was the potential for consumer confusion – particularly if they are similarly priced. Putting the Windows RT surface device out at $199 does away with much of that confusion and puts the device squarely in the affordable “media consumption” tablet space (something for which Microsoft has continually derided the iPad and Android tablets). It could be the best device in this category – blowing away the Kindle Fire. Of course, this low-functionality positioning is a bigger risk if the breakeven model relies on the upsell of productivity apps (its unclear what version of Office will ship with the Surface) or a vibrant apps marketplace – you don’t need either of these to surf the Web or watch videos.
  • It’s a recognition that this is the only way Windows RT will gain traction. As I said when ARM-based Windows was announced back in early 2011, this seemed like a major coup. Since then, though, it has looked more and more like the Windows RT tablet would be DOA given its lack of backwards compatibility, improved x86 performance, and a price point similar to the iPad. But, $199 for a very compelling-looking device would mean that all bets are off; this is a sweet-spot price for impulse consumer electronics purchases and would guarantee very healthy sales (stock allowing). It would also have the added benefit (to Microsoft) of killing off the premium Android tablet market; then again, Google’s Nexus 7 is doing a pretty good job of this already.
  • It’s a massive internal shift in Microsoft’s strategy. If bringing out its own tablet and disenfranchising OEM partners wasn’t enough, a major Microsoft division is now looking at taking a bath on each unit sold. Bear in mind that this is one of the divisions that has always looked down on Xbox and the consumer businesses for haemorrhaging money. Sure, Microsoft sold Xbox hardware at a loss, but game consoles are recognized industry loss leaders and have shown that the razor/razor-blade model works. Selling enough software, content, or advertising (ha!) for a tablet that may cost you $100 more than the asking price to get out the door is a different matter altogether.
  • It’s an explicit statement of intent: OEMs will only be able to compete with x86 devices. OEMs are already hurting from a declining (traditional) PC business with razor-thin margins; they can’t afford to subsidize their own Windows RT tablets in the same way that Microsoft can. And nobody is going to pay a significant premium for an HP, Lenovo, or Dell device over Microsoft’s own Surface tablet. So if the price point is real, Microsoft is basically carving out the ARM tablet market for itself.

It’s an interesting time for Microsoft. It desperately needs a successful tablet launch to stay relevant — and for that reason, the first three points above are at least plausible. The final point though is more far-fetched. Kicking the OEMs when they are down is one thing; letting them announce Windows RT devices and then bringing your own to market at half the price is more akin to robbing them at knife point. For this reason, my opinion is the $199 price is bogus or contains contractual telco smallprint.

Earnings Season: What Recent Results Say About Consumer Firms’ Future Prospects

In what is turning out to be one of the most interesting quarterly earnings reporting seasons for some years, Apple, Zynga, Nintendo, Microsoft, and Intel have all “surprised” the market with their “low” numbers — but there are fundamental differences in why these firms have had a tough quarter. (I’m going to use calendar quarters rather than financial quarters to avoid things getting far too complicated).I can think of four main reasons (I’m sure there are more):

  • The tough product transition period, part 1: Apple. Apple had a pretty good Q2 2012 — far better than a year ago — but unfortunately it came on the back of a huge Q1 2012 (largely thanks to iPhone 4S). Citing poor demand in Europe among other factors, Tim Cook also made some interesting comments on the earnings call alluding to anticipation of iPhone 5 reducing demand for current products. Pent-up demand for the new phone seems unprecedented; once this device hits the market, Apple numbers should “improve.” It’s a testament to the financial markets’ belief that Apple can do no wrong that this shock miss of Wall Street’s inflated earnings estimates (albeit more in line with Apple’s own projections) shaved 5% off the share price overnight.
  • The tough product transition period, part 2: Nintendo. Another firm whose current products are looking tired but whose shiny new products aren’t quite ready is Nintendo. The Wii has dropped off console sales charts in the past year, and while the 3DS is doing good business in the portable space, the release of new Wii U consoles is still (probably) several months away. It’s going to be a tough 2012 for Nintendo; crucially, there isn’t that guaranteed pent-up demand for the new console that Apple enjoys with the iPhone 5.
  • Great business but bad investments coming home to roost: Microsoft. In many ways, Microsoft is also in a transition period — Windows 8 OS and accompanying Surface devices won’t arrive until October 26, 2012 — but luckily the rest of its products haven’t run out of steam. In fact, Q2 2012 was a good quarter with rising revenues; it’s just a shame that its on-going fruitless attempts to build a consumer media/advertising strategy led to a $6.2 billion writedown.
  • A changing market causing (hopefully) short-term pain: Intel, AMD, PC OEMs. As expected, a tough global economy and the on-going consumer (and business) infatuation with tablets is hitting traditional PC sales numbers. Ironically, the solution to the tablet challenge may also be causing consumers to delay PC replacements while they wait to see a proper tablet + Windows solution, which won’t happen until the end of October.
  • Wow, we did not expect that! Zynga. Cracks started to appear in Zynga’s “grinding games without the fun game bit” business model some time ago; its valuation at IPO (in November 2011) was based on the continuing stratospheric growth of user numbers (and the accompany microtransaction revenues) seen with early hits like Farmville and Mafia Wars. Unsurprisingly, like every other videogaming market, social games have turned out to be a hits-driven industry, with relatively low barriers to entry and a fickle audience. It also highlights the danger of relying on someone else’s platform (Facebook) over which you have no control. And the strategy of buying a rival “star” product/ firm (Draw Something by OMGPOP) for top dollar just as it became a “dog”(entirely bypassing the “cash-cow” phase) didn’t help . . . see this if that last sentence didn’t mean much to you.

Of course it’s not all doom and gloom: ARM and Samsung have reported excellent results of late — and even Facebook did moderately OK, even if that didn’t stop the markets from punishing its share price for not doing better, probably due to the fact that the firm still hasn’t worked out how to really ramp up revenues.

So, while Q3 is typically a quiet period for consumer firms, Q4 is shaping up to be a litmus test for firms like Apple, Nintendo and Microsoft – new products that will need to succeed (and fast), landing at a time when consumers still seem unwilling to recommence their profligate spending ways.